Category Archives: Sustainability

Corporate Sustainability from the Millennials’ Perspective


In the tradition of storytelling, allow me to revive this blog by sharing with you a talk I made at the 3rd National Sustainability Conference: The Future Leaders’ Summit. A millennial myself, the idea of embracing this creature called corporate sustainability is something that our generation is starting to understand. I see young entrepreneurs and professionals passionately pursuing sustainable practices in the conduct of their enterprise and the outcome is very enlightening and refreshing.

Below is the abridged version of the slides converted to pictures for your reading pleasure.

All the best!

Is this true?

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FUTURE LEADERS’ SUMMIT ON SUSTAINABILITY


The University of Asia and the Pacific’s Center for Social Responsibility will be holding its 3rd National Sustainability Conference tomorrow, 20 November at the Dizon Auditorium, University of the Asia and the Pacific, Ortigas Center, Pasig City.

3rd NSC Poster

This year’s conference highlights  the role of the YOUTH in creating a sustainable future as well as on BUSINESS innovations that can best contribute to the creation of shared value and inclusive growth. This combination of young leaders passion and business CEO’s insights will offer unrivaled generational perspectives on how best to shape a sustainable future for the Philippines.

The organizers has reformatted the program to allow more participants interaction, spontaneous peer-to-peer sharing and hands-on experience. Specifically, the morning session will be devoted to the student and youth participants while the afternoon session will have an interactive set-up involving the youth, corporate participants, academic experts, social media practitioners, and civil society leaders.

Here are good reasons why you should take part in this year’s conference:

  • Fresh learning opportunities on the latest and future trends in sustainability practices, and a chance for you to learn how they can be applied to your own work;
  • High quality and cutting-edge insights from the country’s respected business executives, youth leaders, academic and professional experts;
  • The opportunity to expand your network and interact with more than 200 participants especially the youth through the Philippine Education Network (PEN), a group of 30 colleges and universities nationwide, along with student leaders from top universities in Metro Manila
  • Unique platform to impress upon the participants the business sector’s contribution to a sustainable future, thereby, influencing the youth’s career options for employment

Want to know more what’s in store? Take a look at the roster of topics and speakers:

Morning Session 

The Future We Want: Seeing Sustainability through the Lenses of the Youth 

  • What is Sustainability?  by Ms. Marilou Erni, General Manager, Petron Foundation 
  • Enabling the Youth to Promote Sustainability through Social Media  by Ms. Maria Ressa, CEO, Rappler
  • Best Practices and Innovations in Youth-Business Partnerships  by Ms. Agnes De Jesus, SVP, Energy Development Corporation (EDC)/Mr. Dave Devilles, Senior Corporate Communications Specialist, EDC 
  • Youth and Sustainability Issues in Everyday Life: How young People can  Make a Big Difference through Small Concrete Steps  by Ms. Techie Cano Lopez, AVP, TeaM Energy/ Mr. Ricky de Castro, SBEP & Executive Director, TeaM Energy 

Lunch break

Afternoon Session 

Sustainable Philippines: Business Contribution to Creating Shared Value and Inclusive Growth

  • Moving Toward a Sustainable Philippines: The Crucial Role of the Private Sector and the Youth by Dr. Bernardo Villegas, Professor, UA&P
  • Creating Shared Value and Inclusive Growth: Perspectives from the Corporate Practitioners

Panel of Speakers:

Ayala Land
Philippine Long Distance Company
TeaM Energy
MMDA
Petron Corporation
Chamber of Mines of the Philippines
Center for Food and Agribusiness, UA&P
San Roque Power

For reservation and any inquiries, please contact Mr. Carl Moog (carl.moog@uap.asia) at 6370912 loc. 302
or 360. Thank you and we hope to see you at the conference.


Back from the Hiatus


Hi everyone!

It’s been a while since I posted in this blog. The past three months had me juggling projects like producing the integrated annual and sustainability report and preparing for an internal branding program in a change management setting.  In the next few days, I will be posting about the recent sustainability reports that have been published here in the Philippines to check the pulse and where reporting is headed. I will be posting about my recent experience in New York during the 2013 IABC World Conference. Lastly, I will be echoing the discussions that happened in the forum of the University of Asia and the Pacific’s Center for Social Responsibility tackling the changes of the new GRI G4 guidelines.

Keep checking back my blog for these posts. I will find time to distill my thoughts and share them with you.

Rainy season has started here. Stay dry my friends.

Below are photographic snippets to whet your appetite. All the best!

This was the infographics-stlye rendition of an IABC member that captured the discussion on CSR Strategy and Communications

This was the infographics-stlye rendition of an IABC member that captured the discussion on CSR Strategy and Communications

Energy Development Corporation releases its 2012 integrated annual and sustainability report, GRI A+

Energy Development Corporation releases its 2012 integrated annual and sustainability report, GRI A+

The name has a face -- Prof. Craig Carroll's body of works on CSR has been my reference when I took up my Masters in the UK. It was a very pleasant experience to finally meet him in person.

The name has a face — Prof. Craig Carroll’s body of works on CSR has been my reference when I took up my Masters in the UK. It was a very pleasant experience to finally meet him in person.


Corporate Sustainability Videos: Spotlight on Energy Development Corporation


Today’s blog features Energy Development Corporation or EDC. EDC has been instrumental in making geothermal energy viable in this part of the world. From its inception as a state-owned corporation to its privatization as part of the Lopez Group, EDC has always blazed the trail in developing sustainable power projects. Most of its initiatives in environmental management are now modeled in national regulatory processes like the promulgation of social benefits to host communities (ER 1-94) and the application of the scoping and social acceptability process in the Environmental Impact Assessment Statement.

EDC is the only energy company in the Philippines to earn the Client Leadership Award from the World Bank-International Finance Corporation after Manila Water Company.

This video shares its story on how EDC had shaped and is continuing to shape the practice of sustainability in the developing energy projects. The company has international expansion programs in Indonesia, Peru and Chile.

Disclaimer: The views written in this blog is that of the author only and may not necessarily represent the organizations or entities mentioned.


An Industrial Past and a Sustainable Future


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I have always been fascinated by the industrial revolution that began in Manchester. Imagine yourself standing in the middle of a beautiful tumult – new way of doing things, new way of thinking, new world order. Commerce and trade bustled more in Manchester than in any part of the world. The Guardian once wrote. “What Manchester does today, the world does tomorrow.” Indeed, Manchester was the epicenter that rocked the world.

Now, imagine my exhilaration when in the autumn of 2010, I finally set foot on Manchester’s soil to pursue a long-awaited dream. That bohemian Britannic mood was palpable in the air and I can almost feel the metallic vibe of Manchester’s historical importance as the birthplace of the industrial revolution. And yet, the urban blight and pollution that characterized that era is no longer visible. Forward-looking architecture punctuates the skyline with environmentally designed buildings that are made even more stunning with their bizarre structure. What I saw is a city moving forward in a sustainable manner. The spirit of sustainability is evident in the University of Manchester where I spent a year to pursue further education under the auspices of the Foreign Commonwealth Office as one of the three Filipino Chevening scholars that year.

 

Leaving an Indelible Mark

The university’s business school is the only academic institution in the world to offer a Master of Science degree in corporate communications and reputation management. The business school encourages the application of original thinking. The historical role of business and its relationship with society produces quite different articulations of the sustainable development agenda. A credible business reputation does influence the interpretation of sustainability and therefore, the appropriation (or non-appropriation) of resources to make it happen (or not). My dissertation pursued a research topic that showcased a sustainable business model in the Philippines.

Booth Street West became my second home in Manchester. It houses the business school where I attended classes. A month after I joined the university, professors Andre Geim and Konstantin Novoselov were awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics for their work on the grapheme, which at just one atom thick is the strongest material known to man. The university now has 25 Nobel laureates under its belt. For the first time in living memory, this red brick university has more Nobel Prize winners on its staff than either Oxford (which has none) or Cambridge (which has two). Nobel winners who teach at the university are former World Bank chief economist Joseph Stiglitz and Sir John Sulston who cracked the DNA sequence of the nematode.

There is joy to be found in working in an interdisciplinary environment, much more in a multi-cultural mix. In my course, the Brits are the minorities and we Asians are the majority. The coursework expanded my understanding of the different facets of the sustainability paradigm and provided new skills that I can definitely use when I go back to work.

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Seasons and Lessons

Like the changing of the seasons, Manchester is a continuing transformation. It may no longer be the workshop of the world but it certainly influenced modern-day capitalism and politics. To experience its culture, to learn more its history and to take inspiration on what it is doing for its future – all these motivate me to be an influencer of change in my own right, to be able to tell the world our story and how Filipinos are perfecting a renewable energy technology as a solution to the climate change problem. Today, I work for a renewable energy company where its impact reaches 18,000 households and 9 million customers. Unlike too many companies today, it does not use sustainability to greenwash bad practices. I am proud to be part of an organization that leads the business sector in this way of thinking.

With the many exciting things that the Chevening scholarship has brought me, I know that my journey is just beginning. Manchester is demonstrating that a toxic past can be washed away and replaced with a cleaner future. Its future is green and bright and I see no reason why ours here in the country should not be.

 

This blog post is a re-print from the alumni story in the webpage of the UK Embassy in Manila.


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